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Unique Presentation Strategies You Haven’t Considered (Part 1)

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When was the last time you were truly “wow-ed” by a presentation? You know, the type of presentation that leaves you thinking about it for days…and for all the right reasons? Unfortunately, these impressive presentations seem to be far and few between. Instead, you’re left sitting through endless hours of boring, run of the mill presentations, meetings, and seminars. 

Unfortunately, there’s no way to get that time back. What you can do, however, is ensure your own presentations never leave your attendees feeling that same way! And how you’ll do that is by giving one of these unique presentation strategies a try for your next go round. 

Unique Presentation Strategies

Prioritize body language

Here’s a thing; people often remember the verbal side of presentations, but forget to hone their non-verbal ones. Body language is one of the most important things when it comes to presentation, even if you’re doing one remotely.

In a way, it feels like working remotely has removed the essence of body language from presentations, but that’s not the case. Body language has become more important in retrospect. Slouching over your screen, or hiding behind camera issues is no way to approach a presentation. If anything, such actions tend to completely disengage the audience. Just like with normal presentations, one has to take care of their hands, their face, and their posture when presenting remotely. 

Combining good body language with other hacks like keeping your presentation short or engaging your audience through questions makes any presentation more admirable and attention-worthy to the audience.” — Sally Stevens, co-founder of FastPeopleSearch.io 

Focus on the needs of your audience

“Your presentation needs to revolve around what the audience wants to get from it. Don’t just assemble what you can tell them and present it. Instead, ensure that you research the audience’s needs and interests, then keep the presentation simple. Simplicity makes it easy to understand, and they can respond and be part of it. As you present, take note of the reaction from the audience. It can guide you on what to focus on and what to avoid.” — Harriet Chan, CocoFinder

Tie everything up in a bow

“Spend a significant amount of time and effort deciding on a forceful core technique and basing your presentation on it. When you conclude, tie everything up in a bow. Remind your audience why they came to hear you speak. Refer back to what you said and how it relates to the overall message. List all the vital takeaways and any probable calls to action; what should they do now that they have all this beneficial information? Because it’s your last chance to emphasise your point and keep it fresh in their minds long after you’ve left the stage.” — Shiv Gupta, Marketing Director, Incrementors Web Solutions

Try the Think-Pair-Share approach

Shiv also shares the following presentation strategy:

“Start considering the ‘think-pair-share’ approach when introducing a new concept to a small group. In this method, participants first think silently about the difficult concept, then team up with neighbours to debate, and then present their aggregate views with the audience. This method allows the audience to pause, think about, and reflect on the instructional information. Incorporating experiential learning into your presentation by encouraging the audience to work collaboratively with the knowledge. Allow for extra time in the presentation, make sure the seating arrangement is conducive to short talks, and show condensed concepts for referencing during the presentation.”

Redirect and refocus

“Redirect the attention of your audience. According to studies, the average adult cannot maintain the same level of concentration for more than 20 minutes. This means that your audience will lose concentration early in your presentation before seeking to refocus at various points throughout the presentation. Changing the direction of your production in such a manner that participants’ minds may shift gears is one approach to handle this. You may accomplish this by gauging understanding with questions. No one likes to appear foolish, so once you start calling them, you’ll quickly regain their attention. 

Another way is to provide the opportunity for debate and to practice the thought you just presented. You can also incorporate images, short videos, or tell stories to reinforce the ideas and concepts you delivered. The bottom line is, you have to do these intervals before 20 minutes, or you risk losing your audiences’ focus.” — Brian Dordevic, Director of Strategic Planning and Digital Marketer, Alpha Efficiency

Did you learn something new in this post? Let us know which of these presentation strategies resonated with you the most, or share your own strategies! And of course, check back soon for even more ideas and insights. 

 

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